tbonejenkins: (Default)

So Wizard World finally decided to stick a Comic-con in Madison and see how it goes. Now mind--I've been going to cons since 2008, butI've never been to Comic-con, so seeing that there's one now pretty much in my backyard. I had no excuse. I had to go see it. I also took my 10 year old son and his friend, because kids 10 and under were free. Couldn't pass that up.

 Boys at Pokemon booth

Size: So, obviously, Comic-con is larger. Much, MUCH larger. I don't know what the final total was, but I can easily see 10,000 people alone being at the con. 

Venue: They held most of Comic-con in the large Alliant Center exhibit hall, which is pretty big until you realize what it really is: A gigantic Dealer's Room. I mean, big, big biiiiiiiiiiiiig Dealer's room. And I've been to Chicon, and that was pretty huge. But at the same time, they had things in there that you wouldn't necessarily find at a regular con's dealer's room. For instance, they had a gaming area towards the back where you could do board and card games. I had read in the programming that they would have Pokemon card battles, but I didn't see anyone playing it, so I was disappointed. But the boys and I had a rousing game of Clue, so it actually turned out all right. 

The rest of the floor was devoted to dealers, comics...and celebrities.

Celebrities: So this is something that I absolutely have not experienced before. When I first started going to cons, most were all literary, so there were many places that had my favorite authors right there. In fact, the very first person I met at my very first con was Nisi Shawl, where I proceeded to have my very first fangirl experience (and startling her in the process, I'm sure). But most of the cons I've been to have been literary, and my celebrities--famous authors--were mostly down to earth folk who were easy to approach, and love hanging out in bars. 

Comic-con is so very different. It's a pop-culture con, so no literary folk. Heavily media oriented, particularly film and TV shows. And they had stars. William Shatner and Edward James Olmos stars. And we saw them all from a distance. Because the difference between authors and celebrites are a good $50 to get even close to a celebrity. 

That had to suck for them. Because for the most part, you had to pay to even get in line to talk to them. Which worked I guess if people are watching your show, or if people still love you. But if you're a nobody, or worse, a has been, well, no one pays to see you. I saw a lot of celebrities sitting there, looking bored, playing on their phones. (Omigosh, George Wendt. For the longest time I was trying to figure out why the heck George Wendt from Cheers was there. I learned that he had actually done a lot of cartoon voices, but come on. George Wendt? Really?)

That said, I was able to wave at Ernie Hudson. And shoot, I totally missed Billy Dee Williams. But really, ain't no way was I going to pay to get up close to them. Which is sort of sad.  But I did get to see Shatner and Olmos.

Panels: So Panels were held in the meeting room portion of the Alliant Center--meaning one large room and two smaller rooms. Which means the panels were pretty much held one after another. I actually liked that. Single panel programming made it easier to attend. The panels with the celebrites were short--only 1/2 hour long. 

We got in line for the first panel, which was Edward James Olmos. I was thinking that would be packed, but surprisingly, all of us was able to get in with room to spare. I really enjoyed Olmos's session. He talked about not just Battlestar Galactica, but also Blade Runner, West Wing, and other shows. And he also talked about the value of diversity in shows and even a bit about how BSG was used to explore racial tensions, which could be used in Ferguson (I was deeply, deeply impressed by that. Even Olmos gets it).

After Olmos's time was up, Shatner was next in the same room, so we basically stayed put. Which was awesome. Okay, yeah, I did feel a litttle bit sorry because I heard the line for Shatner coming into the room was twice as long. But NOT SORRY ENOUGH.

Besides, they showed Shatner's session on a big screen TV in the food area, so it all worked out in the end.

Shatner. Well. What can I saw. With Olmos, he and another guy sat on stage across from each other and talked in an interview format and also took questions from the audience. Shatner came out and dragged a stool out to center stage, where he talked to the audience--well, monologued the audience for most of the session. But he's a showman, first and foremost, so while it wasn't much about Star Trek, and more about this motorcycle he's building he still had us rolling in laughter.

There was a moment thought that I considered to be my favorite part of the day. As I mentioned, I had brought along my son and his friend. So whereever I went, they had to go with me. This included Olmos, which neither of them had heard of (because no I did not to show my son the rebooted BSG. What's wrong with you?). So while I was listened to an engaging, thoughtful commentary on race in media, they were bored as rocks.

My son, on the other hand, did know Shatner from watching the old episodes, so he was quite excited. So he clapped and cheered when Shatner came. Then he started talking, and he's talking about UFOs and riding his motorcycle in the desert and hallucinations and quantum physics and so on, and at about a good seven minutes into his monologue my son, my beautiful, darling son, heaves a sigh and says in a whisper loud enough for everyone around us to hear: "I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT HE IS TALKING ABOUT."

Which, let's face it, we were all thinking that.

The evening panels were more indicative of ones I was used to. Attended a hilarious comedy show put on by Cthulu's Comedy Collective, and I checked out the costume contest, which was fun. Speaking of which:

Costumes: I like this part of science fiction cons. The ones I go to are usually geared towards serious discussion (and there are a few who outright discourage wearing costumes). So was neat to go to Madison Comic-con and satisfy that part of my inner geek. Not just seeing all the awesome costumes, but participating in it myself along with my son. It's not everyday that I get to dress up as a delinquent catholic school cat girl.

  

But the costumes were phenomenal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of course, many selfies:

 

And of course, Dr Who. 

The boy was in heaven. There was a moment when we came to an intersection in the exhibition hall right at the same time as two other Dr Whos and a walking Tardis. My son and the other Dr Whos all looked at each other, then whipped out their sonic screwdrivers and pointed them at each other. I'm still trying to decide if that was a geeky Dr. Who thing or a male thing in general.

 

Also, for some reason, a whole lot of Harlequinns. Which is interesting, because none of the movies have featured Harlequinn. But a lot of women apparently like dressing up as her. Huh.

Overall: I had gone to Comic-com with low expectations and left pleasantly surprised by how much fun I had. Would I do it again? Hmm. I don't know. The steep membership (or weekend pass, however they call it) and all the add-ons you have to pay for to get like VIP access to events to me wasn't that much worth it. I'm not a big TV person, so I didn't care much about the celebrities who were there, and the ones I did know, I was like 'meh' (well okay, I was bummed I missed seeing Billy Dee Williams, but even there I would've seen him from a distance.) Also, there was the fact that there were TOO MUCH PEOPLE. There were no quiet places for introverts like me to go and recharge. I also missed my standard author hangout at Barcon. In fact, the Comic-con pretty much shut down after 9pm. There were several bars that hosted afterparties where you could get in free with your wristband, but by then, I was so burnt out, I didn't want to hang out with a bunch of other strangers at a bar blasting loud music. I just wanted to go home. And finally, yeah, the comic-con felt pretty...commercial. Many of the emcees were obviously not from Madison, and they were pretty blatant about it. It got irritating after a while. Most of the panels were celebrity based. There were only a few panels that had local people--the aforementioned comedy troupe from Milwaukee, for instance. (Okay, Milwaukee isn't considered local to Madison, but I'm not complaining).

That last reason, though, is something that absolutely can be fixed. I think the good thing about the WizardWorld comic-cons is that they conform to whatever cities they're in by the use of local volunteers. For instance, I know at the Chicago Comic-con, there is a whole group of authors who appear as special guests, and the panels are more numerous and diverse--heck, they even had a few panels that discuss diversity in fandom. So if I do go back, I wouldn't mind going in as a volunteer panelist or something. The thing I liked about Madison Comic-con was that it pulled in a bunch of people who aren't necessarily into the local con scene, but want that con experience. And if they come back next year, that might actually boost attendance at the local cons. Win all around. So yeah, I'd go back to WizardWorld Madison Comic-con in 2016.

Especially if Jesus comes again.

 

 

tbonejenkins: (sad Izumi)

So, um...stuff happened in 2014. Lots of stuff. Some good. Some bad. Probably the worst of it was during December. Don't worry. The boy is fine. Hubby is fine. I, physically, am fine. My mental health...still in recovery mode. 

It's why it appeared that I dropped from social media, particularly Twitter and Facebook, during November and December of last year. Too much for me to deal at that point. There's a few people who knew what's going on and been walking with me and my family through it (to use a Christianese term). At some point, there will be a blog post going up that goes more into it, but it's still a little raw right now. Sorry for the vagueblogging.

That said, I'm doing better. Not great, mind, but better.

So then, how did 2014 fare for my writing?

Well, that year saw my most popular story to date, 21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus One). Seriously, I had no idea how many people would love this story. So much so, it made 3rd place in the Strange Horizons 2014 Readers Poll. How crazy is that? I wasn't expecting that to happen--I was just having fun with spiral staircases.

Interestingly, a month after 21 Steps came out, my other short story, Sun-Touched, was also published. That one dropped like a stone in water. I'm still puzzling over it, because I would consider that one the more ambitious story. I was trying hard to push myself out of the fantasy box and stretch my imagination. But ah well. Ultimately, I have no real control whether a story is liked or not. The only thing I can do is to keep writing and putting stories out there for people to read. 

That grew more challenging in 2014 when I moved to full-time work. Writing during a set time period dwindled to writing in short bursts. I've already written about that, so I'm not going to rehash it. Nowadays, I'm taking the advice of Jeff VanderMeer in his awesome book Wonderbook: write whenever I can, however I can, using the least obstacles to get my words to the page. (And here's a plug--if you're a writer, get Wonderbook. Get it now. Omigosh it's so AWESOME.) Currently, my writing media is 8x5 notepads. Not as daunting as full spiral notebooks and easier to carry. I write at home. I write at church. I write during breaks at work, when I'm waiting on the phone, when I'm cooking dinner (I'm simmering chicken korma curry as I write this up at hand). Evenings I enter my handwritten work into Scrivener, rinse, repeat.

I grant you, it's slow--work has gotten extremely busy for me, and there are days when all I can get down is ten words. But I've made it a rule now that I write something--anything--every dayIt may be only a tidbit, but get enough of those going and...well, in September, I was able to finish the first draft of a new short story, which was something I didn't think I could do. Right now, I'm working on the second draft of another story. And I'm still working on Willow. 

So, writing wise, 2014 was a year of changes, even for my writing. I'm hoping they're good changes though, in that it's forcing me to write tighter and better. We'll see how it goes this year. And, just to remind you, 21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus One) is eligible for awards. Let's see how far this baby goes!

tbonejenkins: (Reading Izumi)

So I'm beginning to see people listing the works they've done for 2014 that are eligible for awards. My short story "21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus One)" , published in February 2014 by Strange Horizons, has been generating a lot of buzz, so I thought I get it out there. (and hey, I'm actually on time on making this type of announcement, too!)

You can both read and listen to it on the Strange Horizons website. Also, if you are a Drabblecast B-Side subscriber, you can listen to a reading there as well as view new art!

You may also want to check out my story "Sun-Touched" published by Kaleidotrope in March 2014. 

Thanks for reading!

tbonejenkins: (Reading Izumi)

Via Tardis, no da.

So I'm back from ICON 39. It was wonderful and intense.

The intense portion was more due to the fact that I was taking part in Paradise ICON, a mini-workshop for neo-pro writers. Basically think Viable Paradise shrunk into two days. The first day we spent critiquing each others' manuscripts; the second was spent being taught by the Guests of Honor, Elizabeth Bear and Scott Lynch (my instructors at VPXV) and Toastmaster Jim Hines, whom I met at Mo*Con. 

But really, I was there to learn how to be author.

The day before the con started, there was a Barnes and Noble signing that was sponsored by the con. I was asked to attend and to bring books to sign. This was something I've never really done before. The only books I'm in are anthologies. Normally, I'd get a reader's copy along with my pay, but I never really thought to actually purchase more copies to sell at cons. I knew people who've done it though. If I did this, it would involve spending my own money to buy copies to sell. And I always had that adage beat into me: money always flow towards the writer.

But in this case, would it be profitable? Would it be worth it? 

I decided to do an experiement. I bought five copies from my publisher to take with me. I figured, at the worst, I'd sell one, maybe two copies. The rest I'd either give away or sell at other cons. At the end of the con, I sold not one, not two...but three. Yes, they were to people in my workshop, but still...three copies!

My first book event!

It was a good learning experience. Made me think, okay, maybe I can handle the book thing. Which means I need to finish it.

It was wonderful to hang with Bear, Scott and Jim, as well as make new friends. I really enjoyed meeting the Paradise Icon folk. They're great writers, and hanging out with them was such a delight.

Because I was busy with Paradise Icon, I only saw a little of ICON itself. But I did see some great costumes:

I also met this wonderful lady, Felicity, who was selling hats she made in the dealer's room. 

It's becoming a tradition now that whenever I go to a con, I get a tiny hat. I was most delighted to purchase one from Fine Hats by Felicity . After purchasing it, I had gone to talk with some writer folks. We were standing outside another room which was being used for a wedding reception not related to the con. I felt a tap on my shoulder and turned to see two young black girls in waiter uniforms who were standing at the door of the reception, ushering people in. 

"Excuse me," they said. "But we looooove your hat! Where did you get it?"

Grinning, I pointed to the dealers' room.Their faces fell. "We're on duty, so we can't go in."

"No prob," I said. Went back to the dealer's room, grabbed a few of Felicity's business cards and gave them to the girls. "She sells the hats online. She has an Etsy shop. And..." I lowered my voice. "She's black, too!"

Oh, you should have seen their faces light up. I wished I could've talked to them more about the con, but they had to go back on duty, but it was nice to see them geeking out over the hat.

So, all in all, it was a good time. I had lots of fun, and who knows, maybe at some point I'll visit again, just so I can see Sailor Bacon.

If that's not a sign of a fun con, I don't know what is.

tbonejenkins: (Default)

This Thursday (that's tomorrow), I'll be heading over to Cedar Rapids, IA to attend ICON 39. Most of the time I'll be attending Paradise ICON, the writer's workshop portion of the con, but you'll still be able to see me off and on throughout the con.

One of the things I'll also be doing is attending the Barnes and Noble Book Signing Event Thursday evening, 6:30p to 8:30p, at the B&N located at (333 Collins Rd NE Bldg 1, Northland Square SC, Cedar Rapids, IA 52402). I will have copies of What Fates Impose anthology, edited by Nayad Monroe and which has my story "There are No Wrong Answers".  

What Fates Impose

(BTW...did you know Nayad's got a new anthology coming out? It's called "Not Our Kind" and the Kickstarter for it is happening now. Check it out!)

Here's the rest of my schedule for ICON:

Friday, 10/31

9am - 5pm Paradise ICON

After dinner I should be wandering around the con and/or hanging out at BarCon.

Saturday, 11/1

9am - 10am Paradise ICON

10 am - 12 pm Author Meet and Greet 

1 pm - 3 pm Paradise ICON
 
4pm - 7pm Free time
 
7pm - 9 pm, Rapid Fire Reading, Chestnut Room
 
9pm -- Barcon!
 
Sunday, 11/2
Open
 
If you're coming to ICON, if you can catch me, say hi!
tbonejenkins: (Default)

This has been a year of change. February, my status at work changed to full-time. It's been ten years since I've been full-time at a job. March, my inlaws, who had been living with us for 3-1/2 years, moved to their own place. May, FrenkelFail happened. July, my gall bladder was removed because they found a gallstone.

It is now October, and I can almost say the dust as settled. I know there are a couple of other things that are coming down the pike, but I'll wait until they appear before I mention it. Right now, I want to write about how my writing life adjusted (and trust me, it was a huge adjustment.)

I did a guest blog over at Sarah Hans's website (and yeah, it's been so busy, I'm just now getting around to mentioning it). In it, I mentioned that I started getting up at 5:30am to write. Yeah, that didn't last long. Turns out, I'm really not a morning person. I was only able to do it for two weeks before deciding I really, really like getting my sleep in the mornings. And when I did try to write, I would write well for about 15 minutes or so, run out of steam, then sit there staring blankly for the rest of the hour or so, writing whenever something came to mind.

Come to think of it, that was how I wrote. Period.

A couple of years ago, I was chatting with Sarah Monette about her writing process. Her method was to leave a story project open on her computer and work on it in bits and pieces throughout the day. At the time, I thought it was a slow process. After all, there are many creatives who say to schedule at least an hour to work on a project. Writing in shorter increments won't work because it takes you 15 minutes to warm up and get into your stride and then by the time you are all warmed up, stopping kills the flow.

But...as I thought about it...that's how I was if I was working with a time crunch deadline. When I don't have that, or if I'm brainstorming, or revising?  It doesn't take an hour and a half. Before, I would sit at my desk for an hour, slowly going through the text line by line. If I wrote in shorter time chunks, how would that work? How could I arrange things so I could write in shorter bursts? What I needed was more than just adjusting to writing in a shorter time period. I needed to change my entire writing process.

In a sense, it's like going back to basics with Barbara DeMarco's book: "Pen on Fire: A Busy Woman's Guide to Igniting the Writer Within". In it, she suggested to set aside 15 minutes to work on writing. I can find at least 15 minutes during the day. Can I write during my morning break at work? In 15 minutes, I sure can. What about lunch? 15 minutes there? Afternoon break? 15 minutes At home? another 15 minutes. Hey, that's an hour right there.

Now that I'm writing now at odd times, I needed something that I could have accessible at any moment, at any time, where I could jot down thoughts and lines and words as they came to me throughout the day. Something so accessible, I could use it even when I didn't have access to internet. Get ready, because this will blow your mind.
 
 
 
Ordinary pen and paper. Who'd thunk, RIGHT?
 
Having a physical notebook means that I can write anywhere, anytime. Which, if I'm brainstorming or jotting notes or playing with sentences, it's awesome. I can be thinking about my work, honing it in my head, then jot a few phrases down. Get enough of those, and I got me a working draft.
 
Revisions are a little trickier. It's easier for me to edit drafts on the computer, therefore I needed a way to do it so I can access those drafts anytime, anywhere. This meant changing the place where I stored my work from my local computer to the cloud. Currently I'm using Dropbox, and it's nice. I still back up to local though, because backups are good.
 
This also meant I could no longer bounce between three programs: Writer's Cafe, Word and Scrivener. I had to stick with something that could contain all my work and notes and word processing in one place, that I could access from anywhere. 
 
I loved Writer's Cafe. I really, really did. I even wrote a blog post comparing the two programs, saying I couldn't give up Writer's Cafe even though Scrivener was the better choice. Well, that changed this summer. Scrivener was overwhelmingly better in keeping all my notes, drafts, storyboards, annotations and working drafts in one spot. And as I used Scrivener, I began to discover new ways to keep my writing on track: utilizing the outliner, working with meta-data. You know the best feature I'm loving right now? Color-coding the annotations in my drafts to show what needed to be done in the texts. A sort of to-do list, if you will. Parts I need to brainstorm are in blue, sentence rewrites in white, facts to research in orange--even if I'm not actively writing, I can open Scrivener, choose a color, and work on those in bits and pieces throughout the day. Then, when I'm done, I delete the note. It's nice to see all those notes and comments vanish as the story firms up.
 
Sorry, Writer's Cafe, but from now on, I'll have to go with Scrivener.
 
So that was my summer--figuring out Scrivener and the new writing process. Write in bits and pieces, get them into Scrivener. Expand. Set myself a limit of 500 words. (Oh, yes! Scrivener is awesome for setting daily writing goals). Work on the text in bits and pieces. And, if needed, use a couple of vacation days as writing retreat days, go to a coffee house and write like mad all day.
 
All of this to say, October 1, I finished the first draft of a new 6000 word story. I didn't think I would have time to do that, and I'm quite pleased with it. I've also been working on Willow (because oh gosh, that never ends), and now that I have everything in Scrivener, I find working on it much MUCH easier. 
 
I may have lost time with the expansion of the day job, but nowadays, I've been feeling way more productive than the past three 1/2 years. We'll see how things go.
 
tbonejenkins: (Musing Izumi)
 There’s been a lot happening with Wiscon the past few weeks. I won’t go into it–there are other places you can read up on it– but this week the Wiscon Concom released this statement that Jim Frenkel is permanently banned from Wiscon.

I’m not going to go into the ban itself other than to say it was sorely needed–again, others did a better job of it of explaining why. Also I’m local, so I feel I’m too close to things to share my opinions in public. I’m also a relative newcomer to the con scene, so I don’t think anything I say about Wiscon will have much impact. But there is one thing I do want to say:

In the past few weeks I saw a lot of expressed anger and hurt feelings. I saw turmoil and disappointment. I saw several people step down from the concomm. I also saw a lot of people who said they were angry, but they weren’t going to give up on Wiscon. They were going to work to make things right.

These are the people I want to give their due. Because they worked hard, and they’re still working hard as I write this. And it’s not just local people. It’s people all over the country, people who could’ve just as easily boycotted Wiscon…

(…although this was probably the first time I saw the use of boycotting actually affect change. I’m so used to hearing people decry, “I’ll boycott X or I’ll boycott Y” and for the most part, everyone is like ‘meh’. Many of the people I spoke to who announced they were boycotting Wiscon wasn’t doing it out of spite. They were genuinely concerned for the con and the safety of its attendees. And that helped spur the change within Wiscon itself.)

An institution is only as good as the people that make it up. The Wiscon concom is not perfect, as so many of you pointed out. But they are working on it. And because Wiscon is my home con this is one of the few cons I can go to, the fact that there are people here who are willing to humble themselves, say they’re sorry, then work on change, makes me appreciate them. Deeply.

So thank you, Wiscon, for doing the right thing.

 

tbonejenkins: (Default)

So I've been following with great interest the discussion about dialect in fiction. It started off by Daniel Jose Older's comments of a review of his anthology Long Hidden in Strange Horizons, and followed by Abyss & Apex doing an editorial post on the decision to post two different version of a story with a Carribean dialect. There have been many thoughtful essays on it, including Tobias Buckell, Amal El-Mohtar, and Ferrett Steinmetz, so I don't think I have anything to add except to tell my experience. Which isn't much, but it's my two cents, so take that as you will.

Personally, I've struggled with dialect in my fiction. Growing up, I was the kid who was teased for "talking proper". I understood Shakespeare better than the slang kids used around my neighborhood. So when I write fiction with black kids, I always worry that they don't "sound black enough". But now that I'm thinking about it, I was at least aware of it--we tended to drop our 'g's a lot, mainly in -ing suffixes. "I'm goin to the store."  Using the d sound for th--what's dat? Is it over dere? You know what I miss? 'Fin'. As in "She finna go to the store." "Did you wash the sheets like I axed?" "Man, I FIN to!" 

Interesting aside #1--my mother always mocked us when we said "ovuh dare" for "over there". She said it made us sound like country hicks. That was the only thing she corrected our speech on. Either that or I've blocked out what else she corrected us on.

Interesting aside #2--in college, I dated a white guy who one showed me how to use the 'th' sound. Up to that point, I didn't think there was a difference until he showed me how to place my tongue at the back of my teeth. And by that, he showed me using his tongue. Looking back at it now, I have super mixed feelings about it: on the one hand, there's the dynamic of a white guy teaching a black girl how to speak 'properly' (I'm sure he didn't think about that at all--only thought he was doing a good thing). On the flip side, damn if that wasn't the sexiest linguist lesson I ever had....

So I just wrote those two asides, and I thought huh. Actually, those two asides play a lot into how I write. I'm coming from a background where "proper English" was correct, not just grammar, but also pronunciation. My mother didn't want me and my sisters to sound like uneducated hicks because she wanted us to have clear diction, which in her opinion would get us better jobs than working at McDonalds.. My boyfriend wanted me to speak the way he did. And in the African American community, we don't have the option where the way we speak is consider a "second language" or a "foreign dialect". With us, "white english" equals proper and preferred, "black english" equals ghetto and uneducated. I could show proof, but ain't nobody got time fo dat.

Angry aside #3--I once dropped a white ex-co-worker from Facebook because of that. Seemed to be a nice guy, went to church, volunteered at our community center. When he learned that Obama had been re-elected, he wrote on his wall "Mo welfare fo us all!" I wanted to say, "How can you mentor those kids at the community center and then turn around and write such a thing?" but I was too upset to respond to him Instead, I dropped him like a hot potato.

It would be good to change black english from being a stigma to something more legitimate. One way we can do so is through stories, because it allows us to tell our own narratives. The problem is that there are those who will always see those dialects as low brow and ignorant. How can we move beyond that? I don't have an answer. It's something that is far larger and deeper than I can touch on. The notion that I've been bending  towards the white dominant culture is something I'm just now beginning to recognize in my life. I'm working on a separate blog post about it--it's pretty long and deep, and I'm still trying to decide if I'm going to post it here or somewhere not as public

But what I can do is strive to have more black dialect in my writing. And for me, that means becoming more aware, paying attention, listening. Advocating it more. And having more conversations about it. I liked what Apex Abyss did in putting both versions of Celeste Rita Baker's story "Name Calling" on their site. (Interestingly, I found the original patois version more engaging. I could hear her voice in my head, whereas the edited version was okay, but more muted.)

Isn't that the point of stories? To push us? Transport us? To take us out of our lives and put them into another's?

We also need to give writers a safe space to write stories in their own voices. I thought the point of Long Hidden was to give marginalized voices a chance to be heard. And those voices should include 'black english' because that is just as legitimate. It has its own rhythm, its own music, and to erase that is to erase voices that groaned in captivity, that sang in both joy and sorrow, that shouted for justice, and to this day continues to unsettle, unnerve, and push comfort zones to make itself heard.

Now, if you excuse me, I finna go work on my writin, cause dat’s wha’ its’' ‘bout, son.

tbonejenkins: (Default)

It’s that time of year again! I plan to be at Wiscon 38 this year, with GoHs N. K. Jemisin and Hiromi Goto. And of course, I have a schedule!




Friday, May 23



Reading at Michelangelos

4:00–5:15pm


Come join me along with Greg Bechtel, David D. Levine and James P. Roberts as we read short stories. I’ll be reading “21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus 1)”. Also, there will be chocolate!


POC Dinner, Room 629

5:30-7:00pm 

Are you a Person of Color? Going to Wiscon? Come to the POC dinner! Details can be found on the official FB invite. If you're not on Facebook, we also have a Google Doc where you can sign up and specify the type of meal you want.


Dream Apart: A storygame of the fantastic shtetl, Solitaire

8:00-11:00 pm

I'm participating in a storygame with Benjamin Rosenbaum. A GM-less, collaborative, rules-light, historical fantasy storygame of sorcerers and scholars, midwives and matchmakers, soldiers and klezmers, dybbuks, gossip, pogroms, trolls, rebels, betrothals, demons, angels, blood libel, lusts, and secrets in an Eastern European Jewish shtetl, circa 1850. There's still a slot open!




Saturday, May

24

Complexity in the World of Jem, Conference 4
4:00–5:15 pm

Join me, K. Tempest Bradford, Isabel Schechter and others as we talk ALL THINGS JEM! Let’s explore all this plus the show's gender roles (why are Rio and Eric so controlling), how not to run a business (Starlight Records is a mess), and Jem's curious distrust of the police and law enforcement (the Misfits never go to jail).




Sunday, May
25



No panels for me!




Monday, May 26



SignOut

11:30a to 12:45p

Stop by and say hi, and if you have the What Fates Impose  or the Dark Faith: Invocations anthologies, bring them by and I'll sign them!

tbonejenkins: (Evil smile Izumi)

I have a new story up! You can now read "Sun-Touched" for free over at Kaleidotrope.

You can thank Neil Gaiman for this one. In 2010, I was invited to attend “The Gathering of American Gods” at the House on the Rock. I was trying to think of a cool costume to wear and, well, okay, I was looking for an excuse to dye my wedding dress with tea. I came up with going as the Moth Queen, because I had a pin shaped like a butterfly, but this party would be at night, so moths fit better.

Well, the costume idea petered out, (I wound up going as a vaguely steampunk lady). But the idea of a Moth Queen stuck with me, and I began to play with the idea. How I went from a Queen to a Princess, Queen and Dowager, I don’t remember. but when I came up with the idea of butterfly people (papilion) being enemies of the moth people (doptera), and how the moth people are attracted to light, I knew I had a story.

I will confess, coming up with the backstory and history of the world was somewhat difficult. After I finished it, I shopped it around. One of the rejections I got mentioned that it was a very good story, but the editor wished the doptera and papilion were more insect-like. And this is true. But I had no clue how to make them more insect-like without making them relatable. And besides, I had a selfish wish to keep the figurines as is, which play a part in the story.

Hmm. Writing that though makes me wonder. Can I make a lead character that’s not human, completely alien, and yet make them relatable? At the time I wrote Sun-Touched, I didn’t think I could. Now? I might be able.

In the meantime, enjoy "Sun-Touched", and let me know what you think!

tbonejenkins: (Evil smile Izumi)

It’s now up! “21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus 1)” is up now at Strange Horizons! It has an illustration! It has a podcast! It is so cool!

The inspiration for this story came one day when I was on Google Plus (why yes…I do go there from time to time). Someone had posted an album of different spiral staircase pictures, and when I clicked on the album, it posted all the staircases at once. Seeing all those staircases and spirals got me wondering: what if spiral staircases appeared at random, with no reason whatsoever. What would be at the top? And then I wondered…if spiral staircases could appear out of nowhere, who to say it’s just a normal staircase? What other materials could it be made out of? How fanciful could I make these staircases?

Oh, I had a fun time coming up with the different kinds of staircases. But I didn’t have much of a plot until I came up with the idea that the staircase was a metaphor for epiphanies and enlightenment. Around this time, I had visited my folks back in Chicago, and wound up watching the Help with the womenfolk of my family, including my grandmother, who is awesomely badass. Talking with her and my own mother about growing up and raising kids, made me want to commemorate their strength, while at the same time showing how opportunities seem to open up more for each generation. So I decided to make the spiral story more personal.

The Momma in the story is a mash-up of my mom and grandmother. There are other true parts too; if you know me, you’ll figure it out. I never snuck out of my house, for instance. But the boyfriend part? That’s mostly true. So was the feeling of optimism. My dad never wanted to join the circus though.

Anyway, check it out and let me know what you think. What would your spiral staircase look like?

tbonejenkins: (Musing Izumi)

I've been busy the past few weeks, and I'm about to get even busier. I'll do another post about that, but real quick, here's what I've been up to:

I did a guest post over at Bill Bodden's blog about keeping yourself going when you're in Revision Hell. Warning: I make a confession about Digimon.

I also knitted a Totoro hat, which I blogged about at Nerds of Color . I talked about cosplay, anime and connecting with other black geeks. It also got a mention over at GeekMom, so yay!

On February 3, I have a short story, "21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus 1)" appearing on Strange Horizons, and it will be illustrated!

Finally, in February, I'm planning to participate in the 2014 Month of Letters Challenge. You may remember I attempted the challenge a couple of years ago, but barely got into it before quitting. Well, I'm going to try it again, and this time, I'm going to be tracking my progress over at HabitRPG . If you're interested in joining me, I have a challenge all set up at the Tavern. (Did I mention that you should check out HabitRPG anyway? They've really changed it the last time I posted about it, adding quests, checklists, pets, cool armor. Making a task list has never been so much fun!). nd if you're not on HabitRPG, check out the Month of Letters Challenge anyway. It's a fun way to get back into the habit of sending snail mail. And if you’re interested in getting a letter from me, leave a comment below and I’ll connect with you to get your address. I’d love to write to you!

tbonejenkins: (Default)

Looking back on 2013, it feels like I didn't have much to say.

That doesn't mean I wasn't busy. I've been chugging along on Willow and, for the first time, I've had alpha readers chime in on how things fit together. Sometimes it felt like one step forward, two steps back, and there have been other times when I wonder if it's all worth it, but the story is getting more and more streamlined. As of this writing, I'm 60% done.

I think this whole year, writing-wise, was learning how to write more productively and more quickly. I'm also learning the hard way to get the words on the page and not worry about making them perfect. Spending less time being stuck on things and more on using placeholders to get an idea of what I want, then coming back to it at another time.

Publishing-wise, I only had two items published in 2013, my flash story “Ebb and Flow” at Daily Science Fiction and my short story, "There Are No Wrong Answers" in the anthology What Fates Impose. The former I've been shopping around for a couple of years, the latter I wrote in a month and was immediately accepted. I had fun with both. 2014 will have more publishing news from me, the most notable being my short story, "21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus 1)" appearing in Strange Horizons on February 3. Strange Horizons, y'all!!!! It's going to be awesome. Another short story, "Sun-Touched" will appear in Kaleidotrope sometime next year. This would be my second time published in this magazine, but online this time. There will also be some new poetry from me showing up next year. Details will be forthcoming.

The biggest news I had this year, though, was becoming Associate Editor at Podcastle. I've been listening to Podcastle ever since they debuted in April 2008, but I never thought that one day I'd be slushing stories and narrating for them. And thanks to all the generous donations from the Metacast they did in October, looks like we'll be continuing into 2014. We could still use your support, though, so definitely contribute what you can.

What does 2014 hold? I don't know. What I do know is I want to communicate more. Well, yeah, yeah, there's this whole writing thing. But it's not about that. I want to get in touch with people more. Talk to them more. Have conversations more. Heck, I want to write on this blog more. Make myself a little more vulnerable.

As I'm writing this, Neil Gaiman's latest blog post popped up on my newsfeed about him taking a social media hiatus and doing more writing and blogging. I'm pondering that. It feels that I've grown too dependent on social media. I pass along links and memes I like, but I don't do much speaking.

It feels like I don't have much to say.

I think I'll use 2014 to find my words again.

tbonejenkins: (Evil smile Izumi)

Sometimes I keep forgetting that not everyone has Facebook or Twitter, so I forget to update things here at the Cafe. But I wanted to announce that I am now part of the editorial staff at PodCastle, the fantasy audio magazine that's part of the Escape Artists family of podcasts (which includes EscapePod and PseudoPod, stories for science fiction and horror, respectively). Along with Ann Leckie, I serve as associate editor in reading slush and doing other duties for co-editors Anna Schwind and Dave Thompson (another Viable Paradise alum!).

Part of my new duties is that I get to narrate stories. And you can now hear my very first narration, "Georgina and the Basilisk" written by Leslianne Wilder. She was the third place winner of this past year's flash fiction contest at Podcastle. This along with the other winners, "The Bear" by Taven Moore (2nd place) and "Wuffle" by Chantal Beaulne (1st place), can be heard in Episode 288: Flash Fiction Contest Strikes Back!

Go over and have a listen. If you like what you hear, let PodCastle know in its forum, or donate, or even become a subscriber (to do so, to go PodCastle's page and click on the DONATE or SUBSCRIBE buttons on the right hand side).. It doesn't cost much, and you get some awesome stories, some that might even be picked by yours truly.

I’m honored to be part of an awesome podcast, and I’m looking forward to this new adventure!

tbonejenkins: (Izumi with spatula)

As most of you know, I do most of my writing using Writer's Cafe. It's a great tool I found at the beginning of my writing career when I was looking for something that matched Scrivener, which was only Mac at the time. You can find my write up of that here.

A couple of years ago, Scrivener finally came out with a Windows version. By then, I had become a die hard fan of Writer's Cafe, so I wasn't looking to switch. But I was still curious, so I downloaded a demo and wrote a short story using it. There were some cool features Scrivener had that WC didn't have, but other features WC ruled on that Scrivener was lacking. I decided I was happy with WC enough that I didn't want to shell out $40 for Scrivener.

Flash forward to this summer. WC hadn't been updated for a while, and I found that I really missed some of Scrivener's features. So when I caught Scrivener on sale at Amazon for half price, I snatched it up. I've been using it since. But which is the better writing program?

So without further ado:


CAGE MATCH -- WRITER'S CAFE VERSUS SCRIVENER. FIGHT!!!!!

(Note—I’m comparing Writer’s Café to the Scrivener for Windows version, which I know is a tooled down version of Scrivener for Mac. Yes, I know the Mac version is better, but seeing that I don’t own a Mac, oh well.)

Similarities: WC & Scrivener are both dedicated to the art of writing. You write a whole book in either of them, write short stories, or do screenwriting. You can import text, edit, and export to an external program. You can keep notes, pictures, websites for research, and both programs come with a "corkboard" where you can view outline of your stories.  And both have really good support, Scrivener with its forums and WC with its Yahoo email group.

Differences: WC has different 'programs' within itself that you can choose to do your work via different tabs and/or a desktop that has icons to different parts of yourself, whereas Scrivener keeps everything on one place. WC is geared from the brainstorming and structuring part of writing, while Scrivener's emphasis is more on the writing itself. I'll get into more detail starting with Scrivener.

Scrivener's plusses: As I mentioned, Scrivener is focused on writing. It makes for a great word processor because it has everything there at your fingertips. Conceivably, you can open up Scrivener without knowing anything about how it works and just start writing, because the space is intuitive. You can also make it so that you can block out everything except your writing space. If you're a writer who works by scenes, Scrivener makes this super easy. You can move scenes around, split documents into separate sections and vice versa. You can also write a story in a single text document without splitting into scenes. There are many shortcuts and functions that mimic Microsoft word, such as comments and footnotes, plus features Word doesn't have, such as the document and project notes, which I use to store text I'm editing out of a story on the chance I might need to use it again.

Another thing I really like about Scrivener is that you can make a "Scrivener Link" to point to any document in the program. So you can make your own wiki in scrivener, make key words point to notes. I really wish this feature was in Writer's Cafe. It would make cross-referencing my research and notes so much easier.

I'm still working with Scrivener and discovering new things to do as I go, but I already feel I got more than my money's worth. Scrivener as a word processor and writing tool outshines Writer's Cafe, which also have a writing processor, but is buried and has bare bone features.

Writer's Cafe plusses: WC may not do so well for writing stories, but when it comes to researching, planning and outlining, it outshines Scrivener.

WC's strength is its Storylines feature, which is similar to the corkboard in Scrivener in that you can have cards that show synopses of your story, tags. However, WC allows you to group cards according to "storyline". You can  hide storylines or create multiples storylines. For instance, I have a storyline showing all the plots in my novel, but I also have another storyline showing a timeline of current events, and I have a storyline showing a timeline of the distant past.

WC's also has Scrapbook, which like Scrivener, holds notes and websites for research. One feature WC has that Scrivener doesn't is the ability to double-click on a URL on a webpage and copy it to Scrapbook (very useful when you're collecting information for research). You can also make a collage...not very user friendly, but good if you want to do a visual character sketch.

There's the pinboard, which gives you a unstructured corkboard to brainstorm lists. And of course, there are the notebook and journal features, which allow you to freewrite to your heart's content. You can use writer's prompts and write using a timer.

If you're a freewriter like me, Writer's Cafe is excellent for brainstorming and planning before you get to the actual writing. WC gives a chance for your brain to play before you get down to the nuts and bolts of writing.


The winner? Scrivener (kind of)

I've used Writer's Cafe long enough that I would go to bat for it in a heartbeat. And I still do. But I have to say, if it boiled down to only one program to buy, Scrivener would be the best program because it's all self-contained. I've completed two short stories in Scrivener, and it was super easy to brainstorm, write, proofread, and export the stories into the right format. Julian, the creator behind Writer's Cafe, had written about upgrading WC to include many features Scrivener has, including a better word processor to make it easier to focus on the writing of stories, but this has yet to happen. And now that Scrivener for Windows is out, I dare say that overall, it functions as a better writing tool than WC. If you don't have a writing program and are looking for one, Scrivener is your best bet.

But I can't completely endorse Scrivener for Windows. I don't know how often Scrivener updates its Window version, but it seems many of the functions that make Scrivener a superior writing program has yet to cross over to the Windows version. And this is where Writer's Cafe picks up most of the slack, because while it's not a good writing tool, it's an excellent brainstorming and planning too.

So...if you can get both, do it. I was able to get Scrivener on sale from Amazon a few months ago, and I found that while I do most of the writing in Scrivener, I still do most of my freewriting, brainstorming and plotting through Writer's cafe. Sort of like a left brain/Scrivener vs right brain/WC sort of thing. Both work well together.

Ironically, I'm not using either program to write this blog post. I'm using Evernote, which is a whole different ball of wax altogether. But that will have to be another cage match.

tbonejenkins: (Evil smile Izumi)

My first SWFA sale! It’s a flash story called “Ebb and Flow” and you can read it now for free at Daily Science Fiction!

I wrote this story for a flash contest, back when I was wrestling with feelings of trying for another child. I’m really glad DSF picked it up. Head on over and check it out!

tbonejenkins: (Default)

TL;DR version: We’re heading into our final week of our Kickstarter for the anthology I’m in, What Fates Impose, and wow! We just cracked $4000. ONLY 6 MORE DAYS TO GO!!!! Pledge $40 and you will get, along with the book, a handwritten card by me with the personality type of your choice (either Myers/Briggs or StrengthFinders) its description and a humorous fortune written in calligraphy. (Also, if you want to see this post with the pictures, go to my blog at http://tbonecafe.wordpress.com/2013/07/08/what-fates-impose-kickstarter-update-or-me-write-pretty-one-day/)

But if you want to read the long version, I’m going to talk about calligraphy. And by that I mean, what I really want to say is, I want to thank my parents for forcing me to take drafting in high school.

You see, back when I was in high school, when it came time to choose electives, I was all ready and gung ho to take art, because everyone took art. It was fun. My father, for reasons I have yet to figure out, made me take drafting instead. I wish I remembered why. Something to do with my handwriting, I think. Or was it supposed to build character? I asked him the other day and he said, “Hell if I know.” Which was the answer I pretty much expected from him.

But there I was. A sophomore? Yeah, I think it was my sophomore year. I think I was only one of three girls in the class. I remember getting drafting kits, which involves a T-Bar ruler, a bunch of other rulers, a specific type of pencil, and graph paper. And I remember being very, very disgruntled, because while my friends were making fingerpaint murals and macaroni art and pottery, I was drawing lines and measuring  them and drawing more lines and learning how to make capital letters as straight as possible.

I can’t remember what grade I got, but I’m pretty sure I passed it. You ask me what I learned there and I wouldn’t be able to tell you offhand, except that maybe my handwriting got better. Maybe.

I hated drafting class.

Which is interesting because I love calligraphy.

I’ve been fascinated by calligraphy ever since I was a kid. I got several Sheaffer kits for Christmas, you know, the fountain pen kind that came with different types of nibs and different colored ink tubes, and you put the tubes in the barrel and twist the nib on to pierce the tube? And if you wanted to change colors, you were screwed because it meant pulling out the tube carefully so you won’t spill the ink out, then washing out the nib, which took forever, and then screw the new color in, then you had to do the same thing over again so you could go back to the regular color? Yeah, I loved those pens.

I did lots of calligraphy for a while. Mainly, I wrote poems, practiced the alphabet, and did flourishes on envelopes. Probably the highlight of my calligraphy use was when I hand addressed all the envelopes I sent out for my wedding. I was always insecure about my calligraphy, though, because I’ve never had a real steady hand. I couldn’t write in a straight line and my spacing was over the place. Over time, I stopped doing it, but I kept collecting calligraphy supplies in the vain hope that one day, I would pick it up again.

That day came about a month ago, when Nayad, our editor for What Fates Impose was brainstorming on what we could offer as rewards for backers of the anthology. I thought I’d offer a handmade knitted scarf, but I wanted to do something based off my story in the anthology, which deals with the subject of personality assessment. And I thought, “I can write cards that show Myers/Briggs personality types and a a brief description. I can also throw in a short humorous fortune in the end. And I can do it all in calligraphy.”

So I went to my closet and pulled out my calligraphy tools. Since my wedding, I have amassed quite a bit, including a bunch of dipping nibs that I had no clue how to use—I just thought they looked cool. But this now being the age of the internets, I thought it was high time I learned how to use these old-fangled thingies.

And when I learned, I was like WHY AM I KEEPING THESE AT THE BOTTOM OF MY CLOSET? THESE ARE AWESOME!!!!!

Also, ink, because INNNNNNNK!!!!

So then, I made my first mock up, and I grew immediately discouraged because to me, it didn’t come out right.

The lines were kind of crooked and the spacing was off and…

And that’s when all those lessons I took in high school drafting reared up inside me and said. LaShawn, you need to put down some lines and do some measurements. Get some rulers, girl.

And I said, Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh.

So I got me some rulers, put down some lines, did some measurements, and came up with my second draft, if you will.

Which…actually…still looks lopsided, now that I look at it. Particularly the flourish line. And the personality type still looks shaky (in fact, the first draft, the letters look more stable). But I’m happier about the description. And as I keep practicing, it would get nicer and nicer.

All of this is to say, if you wish to get in on my calligraphy journey, there are two backer rewards left for my calligraphy cards. Pledge $40 and you will get, along with the book, a handwritten card by me with the personality type of your choice (either Myers/Briggs or StrengthFinders) its description and a humorous fortune written in calligraphy. It won’t be super perfect, but I can guarantee it will be authentic.

Oh yes. I want to thank my parents. If it wasn’t for me being forced to take drafting, these calligraphy supplies would still be sitting at the bottom of my closet. Never being used. Collecting dust until, in shame, I sell them to the next poor sop at a garage sale. And I would have never discovered the joy of dipping a nib into ink, shaking the excess off, then sketching the letters into paper just so.

This has brought back the joy of writing.

tbonejenkins: (Reading Izumi)

As I mentioned in my previous post, I’m doing my part to bring more diversity to the SFF genre. And what better way to do that than a new story!

I am excited to announce my short story, “There Are No Wrong Answers”, will be appearing in the What Fates Impose anthology, edited by my fellow Madisonianite Nayad Monroe

Fortune-telling is a tricky endeavor. It's the domain of an assortment of characters with various motives: charlatans looking to make a buck, true believers who may or may not have the gift, and powerful oracles who might be inclined to spin the truth for their own reasons. Which prophecies are true? Which are false? The powers of belief and wishful thinking drive the quest for a glimpse of the future--but is it a true vision? Whether the message comes from Tarot cards, tea leaves, entrails, or in my case, personality assessment, how are lives changed when predictions are made?



Nayad has gathered some awesome storytellers to peer into nature of fate. Here’s the full list of contributors:

Introduction by Alasdair Stuart: "Singing from the Book of Holy Jagger"

David Boop: "Dipping into the Pocket of Destiny"

Maurice Broaddus: "Read Me Up"

Jennifer Brozek: "A Card Given"

Amanda C. Davis: "The Scry Mirror"

Damien Walters Grintalis: "When the Lady Speaks"

Sarah Hans: "Charms"

Erika Holt: "Murder of Crows"

Keffy R.M. Kehrli: "Gazing into the Carnauba Wax Eyes of the Future"

Jamie Lackey: "Another Will Open"

Rochita Loenen-Ruiz: "Body of Truth"

Remy Nakamura: "Pick a Card"

Cat Rambo: "To Read the Sea"

Andrew Penn Romine: "Ain't Much Different'n Rabbits"

Ken Scholes: "All Our Tangled Dreams in Disarray"

Lucy A. Snyder: "Abandonment Option"

Ferrett Steinmetz: "Black Swan Oracle"

Eric James Stone: "A Crash Course in Fate" (new) and "A Great Destiny" (reprint)

Tim Waggoner: "The Goggen"

Wendy N. Wagner: "Power Steering"

LaShawn M. Wanak: "There Are No Wrong Answers"

Beth Wodzinski: "One Tiny Misstep (In Bed)"

This anthology is being crowd-funded through Kickstarter. If it gets funded, we’ll get paid pro rates, and if goes beyond the funded goal, there’ll be more stories and artwork.

BUT WAIT, THERE’S MORE!

Check out the backer’s rewards. Look on down to the $40 level, which is the Palmistry and Calligraphy level. That’s right, you’ll get a little somethin’ somethin’ from me! Pledge $40 or more and I’ll write up a 4 X 6 card from with your Myers/Briggs personality trait and its description in calligraphy. A picture sample is forthcoming.


BUT WAIT, THERE’S EVEN MORE!!!

If you pre-order the anthology before this Thursday, June 20, you will be eligible for a drawing to win prizes: artwork of tarot cards done by Nayad, a signed print of the anthology’s cover, a copy of the book with all our signatures. And as the Kickstarter meets its milestones, there will be even more prizes!

So go check out the Kickstarter, reserve your copy,  and spread the word! Every bit helps. All the answers you seek can be found within this anthology. And if it’s not the answer you’re looking for, well, at least you get some darn good stories.

Tell people about What Fates Impose on Twitter
Tell people about What Fates Impose on Facebook
Tell people about What Fates Impose on Google+

tbonejenkins: (Izumi with spatula)

My name is LaShawn M. Wanak, and I am a black female writer.

I’ve been making up stories since I was four years old. I’ve been reading fantasy and science fiction when kids were still in their primers. I fell in love with the whole genre and knew exactly what I wanted to be. I wanted to be a writer. I wanted to be a black writer, telling black stories, with characters who looked just like me.

I have been writing professionally now for about 9 years. I’ve garnered some sales. My name’s getting a little known. And most importantly, people are reading my stories and are being touched through them. I’m also learning a lot about the industry I’ve chosen. I’ve seen its wonders, and I’ve seen its darker bits.

I’ve been following what’s been happening in SWFA (Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America for my non-writer friends) and the hullaboo over an essay that was printed in its bulletin a couple of weeks ago. The internets exploded in reaction, most decrying the essay. I did not respond because a) I haven’t read the essay because b) I’m not a SWFA member. And because I’m not a member, I don’t feel that I have enough experience to adequately respond to the situation. Besides, there are many, many others who have done so, and done it very, very well.

One of those was Nora K. Jemisen, who referenced it in her GOH speech at a Continuum in Australia last week. If you haven’t read her speech, read it now. It’s brilliant. It’s honest. It’s hopeful. And best of all, it calls for reconciliation within the SFF community. Reconciliation. This is a word I would hug if I could. It’s a word I’m used to hearing since I work in a Christian ministry, but this is the first time I heard it used within the SFF community. To use Nora’s own words:

“I do not mean a simple removal of the barriers that currently exist within the genre and its fandom, though doing that’s certainly the first step. I mean we must now make an active, conscious effort to establish a literature of the imagination which truly belongs to everyone. - See more at: http://nkjemisin.com/2013/06/continuum-goh-speech/#sthash.XbLijUKw.dpuf

It got me fired up, because yeah, I can see it, writers using bridges of words to reach those who would never step foot in communities that don’t look like their own. Stories that stretch the imagination, that would represent all cultures, that would stretch minds, put them in other people’s shoes. This is totally what I would say is my calling as a writer.

And then this happened.

Sigh.

Right.

Common wisdom for such things is to ignore it, to let this guy spew his hate and not respond. But what this guy did was not only name Nora, but he then linked it to SFWAauthors Twitter feed. SWFA caught wind of it and took it down, but the damage is done.

This is more than just a troll. This is an attack. It goes completely against what Nora called for in her speech. It is used to tear down, to discount her as a writer, as a woman, as a black person, and as human.

And do you know what that post says to me?


This is what happens if you try to make a difference. We like our organization just the way it is. And we define how women are portrayed in SFF. We like our bikinis. We like our women stupid and dependent on us. And we like them all white, because their prettier and sexier than you—well, okay, we’ll allow Asian girls, because they’re nice and quiet and subservient.. And if you try to say anything about it, we will tear you down, rip your head off, drag your name through shit, because that’s what you deserve, you monkey you. So go ahead and write your stories, little little girl. You can even join. But keep your head down, don’t make waves, and most of all, keep your fat lips shut.

There are many writers, not just black writers, not just women writers, but all sorts of writers, who will not join because of this.

And this is why I am writing this post.

I’m writing this because I don’t know if I’m going to join SWFA. I don’t think I’m at the point of my writing career where it would be beneficial to me, at this point. (David Steffen wrote a post that sums up my feelings quite well.) But if I do decide to join in the future, it would be because there are writers like Nora and Mary Robinette Kowal and Jim C. Hines and Nisi Shawl and so many others who have paved the way before me, fighting to bring diversity to a genre that needs it so desperately. Because they refuse to be silent, because they call out bullshit when they see it. Sometimes they’re successful. Sometimes they’re not. And sometimes, people would viciously attack them.

I’m writing this not just to show my support to Nora (and did I tell you she’s going to be GOH at Wiscon in 2014?) but to support her vision of reconciliation that is so much bigger than any one of us. And the only way for that to happen is for us to write our stories, our own stories, and get them published, and write more stories and get those published.

I’m writing this because I am a black female writer, and this affects me deeply.

If you wish to show support for the vision of reconciliation in SFF as well, there are a couple of ways to do it.

1) If you are a member of SWFA, you can demand for the expulsion guy who wrote that damaging post. It’s true that he can say whatever he wants, but to use SWFA as a platform for such harmful threats is uncalled for.

2) If you’re an writer of color, or a woman writer, or genderqueer, keep writing. Don’t let this guy dissuade you from submitting. There are markets out there hungry for your stories. And if you’re an editor or publisher, please, make these voices heard.

3) If you’re a reader, expand your reading tastes. Don’t know where to start? The Carl Brandon Society Awards page has some good recommendations. This Tor post is also has an awesome list of POC and women authors in SFF.

It will take a while, but I do believe SFF can one day reflect true diversity. I’m doing my part, and tomorrow, you’ll see how. And if you can’t wait until tomorrow, here’s a sneak preview.

tbonejenkins: (Musing Izumi)

There was a moment at Wiscon when I was dancing with everyone in the dark at the Genderfloomp, that I stopped dancing, looked around, and burst into tears.



These are my people. I don’t want them to go.

I had ditched a family trip to Florida to be at Wiscon. I had a reading Friday night with the Oxford Comma Bonfire with Vylar Kaftan, Michael Underwood and Nancy  Hightower which went well. I was on a panel called “Remote vs Intimate Gods in literature”, which had a former Methodist who was now atheist, a former Catholic who converted to Judaism, and a woman Lutheran pastor who lives with her female partner in Tennessee. The discussion we had was wonderful, and I’m not just talking about the panel—but the long discussion we panelists had afterward with each other. I got a taste of the Kindred Reading Series. And I participated at the Sign out for the first time ever. Got to sign four copies of Dark Faith: Invocations. I was so excited, the first signing I did, I misspelled the word ‘ask’. Because I was so awesome. Or maybe tired.

But most of all, the conversations I had with the people. Ohhhh…my fellow black geeks, asian geeks, puerto rican geeks, gay geeks, trans geeks, bi geeks, poly geeks, straight geeks, atheist geeks, agnostic geeks, muslim geeks, christian geeks, pagan geeks. All of us together in one place. Sure, there were debates and arguments and words said that made people get the stink-eye and misunderstandings, but who doesn’t get that in a family reunion.

And this was indeed a family reunion.

That was why, at the Genderfloomp dance, I realized that I didn’t want any of them to go. I only get to see most of these people once a year.

Sean M. Murphy wrote a blog post that better sums up my feelings. And yeah, there’s going to be a few days when I’ll look around and feel glum and feel out of sorts with the normal world. But it’s okay. It won’t be the same, but I will continue to talk to my Wiscon friends on the internet. Occasionally, there’ll be a couple of us at other cons, like Mo*Con, which is like a smaller, room party. And knowing that N.K Jemisen and Hiromi Goto will be the Guests of Honor at Wiscon 38 already has me planning for next year’s activities.

These are my people. They never really go.

August 2017

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